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SAIKA Fashion&Hair Blog 2018年12月アーカイブ

マイジェネレーション

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ザローリングストーンズ 60'S

すべては1960年代からはじまった
ロック、ファッション、アート
SAIKAが影響を受けて世界に発信する
ヘアデザインの根源がスィンギンロンドンの
時代からはじまったていた。
1960年代、まだ僕が幼少だった頃
この時代のかっこよさをずっと
保ち続けることが現在のSAIKAに
つながっていくと思った。
時は2019年
SAIKAのつくりだすイメージワークの
全てが今、またはじまっていく

SAIKAディレクタ- 齋藤嘉弘

SAIKA COIFFUR 60年代ファッション



Swinging London's BIBA

Biba began as a tiny boutique in Kensington and grew rapidly to become one of the great symbols of Swinging London in the 1960's.



Barbara Hulanicki was born in Warsaw. Her mother brought her and her sisters to Britain after their father was murdered by terrorists in Palestine. She studied at Art College and became a freelance fashion artist for a variety of magazines.

Barbara Hulanicki started 'Biba' as a mail-order operation in 1964 with her husband Stephen Fitzsimon "Fitz'. They felt that the price of designer goods was far too high for most people and adopted and promoted the 'use for a while, throw away and buy more' marketing philosophy.


Barbara designed her own fabrics, generally using combinations of 'art deco' and 'art nouveau'. The business really took off when the Daily Mirror featured one of their gingham dresses and orders started to pour in.



Hulanicki's ultra modern, affordable and attractive styles made her a cult figure in the fashion business leading, in 1963, to her opening the BIBA boutique in Abingdon Road. Dark wood screens, low lighting and pop music gave the place the air of a discotheque and potential customers were actively encouraged to go inside and try whatever they liked.




The fashion of Biba ranged from mini skirts and dresses to trouser suits, T-shirts, boots and a children's department at the back of the shop. Barbara also devised new lines in cosmetics which were perfect for that elegantly wasted look; brown lipstick, which was soon followed by shades of blue, green, purple and black with matching eyeshadows and contour powders. Biba also had coloured wigs and boots with ridiculously high heels, all creating styles which were copied throughout the world.

Twiggy in a black sequin tube dress posing at Biba.

The largest store was opened in Kensington High Street in 1969, which had an all-black 1930s style décor. Selling everything with the famous black and gold logo on it; Biba clothes, Biba make-up, Biba toys, etc. It survived until 1973 when it moved to the old Derry & Toms store in Kensington, finally closing it's doors in the mid-seventies. Bibarelaunched under new ownership in 2006.


SAIKA COIFFUR 60年代ファッション

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Moving on: Clothes are paraded through the streets of London as Biba changes premises

And it was before everyone started taking the Pill, which made women much rounder. 

As well as looking fabulous, the Biba shopgirls knew how to have fun. On Friday nights, for instance, they had a well-tried routine. 

They all went to the TV studios to see the filming of Ready Steady Go, and, as a result, knew the pop stars of the time as close friends. 

Because of this, some of the era's leading bands, such as Manhattan Transfer and the New York Dolls, would perform in the so-called Jungle Room on the top floor of the Biba store. 

That's how Barbara became friends with stars such as David Bowie, Marianne Faithfull and the Rolling Stones' guitarist Ronnie Wood. 

Diana Dors

Diana Dors: The actress hit front pages when she visited the store

Barbara blames big business for ruining the shop. After a corporate take-over, the men in suits tried to make Biba's friendly ad hoc chaos more organised by installing neon signs showing the way to the various departments. 

At first, Barbara co-operated and helped design them. Then, one day in 1974, she chucked them all in the bin and stormed out. 

A year later Biba closed and the backers auctioned off the interior to museums and collectors. The Seventies recession was biting, property prices were going down and the magical mystery decade was over. 

Then came the unkindest cut of all. The Biba brand was taken over by Biruta, the original Biba, who had never seen eye-to-eye with her sister. 

She briefly opened up an alternative Biba in the West End, but it never took off. 

As for Barbara, she moved to Miami, attracted by the Art Deco houses on Miami Beach, which she helped to restore. 

She also designed a music club on the beach for Ronnie Wood.

Twelve years after Biba closed, Fitz died of cancer. 

Barbara still designs private houses in Florida. The results are beautiful, and she can take added comfort from the fact that these days a vintage Biba fashion original may sell for more than $1,000 in a New York department store. 

Still, this just isn't the same as when the girl with the Greta Garbo looks defined the Swinging Sixties London scene. 

  • Beyond Biba, a film portrait of Barbara Hulanicki, is released on 20 September
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SAIKA COIFFUR 60年代ファッション

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As the Biba concept was taking shape, John F Kennedy was assassinated, the U.S. was torn apart by civil rights fever, the Cold War was at its height and The Beatles were still provincial unknowns making small, out-of-town appearances.

So there was little cheer on the scene when Barbara and Fitz started making the daring clothes that were missing from all our lives - launching a mail order label from their Kensington flat. 

Their first success was that Brigitte Bardot gingham dress with matching headscarf. 

The couple sold 17,000 of them for £1.25 (such an outfit would normally be priced at around £25, even in those frugal days), making a halfpenny profit on each and giving them enough money to open their first tiny shop - premises so small they didn't even have space for changing rooms. 

At first, girls changed modestly behind a screen. But soon they became so excited by the clothes that they threw caution to the winds and started spilling out from behind the screen in their undies to grab this and that to try on. 

Word soon got around, and all the legendary male roisterers of the era - rockers, film stars and just plain voyeurs - were lining up outside to catch a glimpse of all this female flesh.

Trendsetter: Barbara Hulanicki

Trendsetter: Barbara Hulanicki

They could barely believe their luck. Hot on their extraordinary success, Biba soon moved to larger premises and their clientele followed them. 

Now everyone was getting to hear about them. One day, busty, curvaceous blonde bombshell Diana Dors turned up in a Rolls-Royce. 

She parked on a yellow line, came in and grabbed an armful of clothes. Just as everyone was wondering what she was doing in a shop which pointedly catered only for size eight and ten dolly birds, she marched out of the shop, taking the clothes with her and stuffed them into her Rolls. 

Hulanicki followed her, dragged her back and put her into a little room she had specially reserved for shoplifters.

Diana Dors smiled, and started reapplying her make-up. Word spread, the Press arrived - and the following day, Diana was on all the front pages. 

It was such a successful publicity stunt that one Saturday afternoon Brigitte Bardot tried to copy her.

The outrageous Bardot went even further, stripping off and jumping up and down stark naked in front of the changing room mirrors. Sadly for her, on this occasion the Press failed to arrive. 

Biba was always a hands-on enterprise. Barbara and Fitz lived behind the shop and when in 1967 they had a son, Witold, they took him to work every day in his carrycot, along with their Great Dane called Othello.

Tales like this only added to the legend. Soon Biba had moved to huge premises in Kensington High Street, where the shop was appropriately nicknamed Big Biba. 

In the semi-gloom that Barbara much preferred to overhead lighting, there were plush sofas to recline on and hat stands to display the goods, buckets full of lipsticks and mascara in 24 colours.

This mix and match had never been done before either. Finally, a girl could indulge her more outré tastes with black vamp nail polish, long before Chanel revived it, or a pair of spangly wellies, such as Marc Jacobs sells now. 

What's more, you could decorate your house to match your clothes - the shop sold black and gold wallpaper branded with Biba's art deco logo. 

You could even stock your kitchen with Biba branded baked beans from the food hall. 

As to service, by then the winning formula was well tried. The shopgirls were all aspiring models, whose modish looks attracted admiration from friends and boyfriends, who would lounge around the store waiting for them to get off work. 

They were all as thin as Twiggy. Barbara had a theory about this: people had a much more frugal diet in those days and ate far less meat. 

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SAIKA COIFFUR 60年代ファッション

The story of the Chelsea Boot




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//Anello & Davide Baba Boot, mid-60s.//

The story of the Chelsea Boot goes back to the 1830s, when they were known as paddock boots, their elasticated sides, snug fit, sturdy design and relative lightness a boon to the equestrian community.

According to traditional footwear suppliers Samuel Windsor, the shoe was originated by J. Sparkes-Hall, bootmaker to Queen Victoria (who wore them regularly).

In the mid-1950s they were sported as leisure-wear by the monied, young  Chelsea Set which gathered in the King's Road and frequented The Markham Arms, Mary Quant's Bazaar and her partners Archie McNair and Alexander Plunket Green's jazz club/restaurant Alexander's.

Slimmed, with a centre seam and a heightened Cuban heel for Flamenco dancers, London's theatrical shoemakers Anello & Davide introduced their version, the Baba boot ("a new Italian-inspired version of that long, lean look") in the early 60s.

Soon the shoe design entered the visual language of rock & roll via fashion-mad teenage beatniks, art students and modernists.

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//Baba boots, Anello & Davide catalogue, 1966. (C) Lloyd Johnson.//

Read the rest of this entry »



SAIKA COIFFUR 60年代ファッション

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//Alan Holston outside Dandie Fashions, 161 King's Road, SW3. From a European pop magazine, 1967.//

Alan Holston has provided these photos from his time as of one the team at key 60s boutique Dandie Fashions.

Holston joined Dandie in 1966 when it was opened by Tara Browne and Neil Winterbottom with John Crittle and Freddie Hornik in premises in South Kensington. Tailoring was supplied by Foster & Tara, the business Browne set up with father and son team Pops and Cliff Foster.

At the beginning of 1967 - by which time Browne had been killed in the infamous car accident - Dandie moved to 161 King's Road with a magnificent psychedelic decor courtesy of Binder Edwards & Vaughn.

Read the rest of this entry »


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/Wondrous World Of Sonny & Cher, Atco, 1966. The duo plump for contrasting black + white Baba boots.//

Following the Chelsea boot post, here are a few images from THE LOOK archives which underline the pre-eminence of Anello & Davide's variant the Baba boot in 60s pop.

Vintage fashion expert Lloyd Johnson explains the distinguishing features of the Baba: "They had wooden heels, Neolite (rubber resin) soles and very grainy soft leather uppers without a toe puff."

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//Pretty Things, 1964. Guitarist Brian Pendleton (far left) in Baba boots.//

According to Lloyd the Baba was priced £3 15/- (£3.75) in 1963. The Embassy, as worn by Pretty Things frontman Phil May (second left in the photograph above) were more expensive at £6.10/- (£6.50), due to the stacked leather heel and sole.

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SAIKA COIFFUR 60年代ファッション

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//Alan Holston outside Dandie Fashions, 161 King's Road, SW3. From a European pop magazine, 1967.//

Alan Holston has provided these photos from his time as of one the team at key 60s boutique Dandie Fashions.

Holston joined Dandie in 1966 when it was opened by Tara Browne and Neil Winterbottom with John Crittle and Freddie Hornik in premises in South Kensington. Tailoring was supplied by Foster & Tara, the business Browne set up with father and son team Pops and Cliff Foster.

At the beginning of 1967 - by which time Browne had been killed in the infamous car accident - Dandie moved to 161 King's Road with a magnificent psychedelic decor courtesy of Binder Edwards & Vaughn.

Read the rest of this entry »



SAIKA COIFFUR 60年代ファッション

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Today THE LOOK was granted a sneak preview of some of the incredible exhibits to be featured in Rebel On The Row, the forthcoming exhibition celebrating the talents and legacy of the late Tommy Nutter.

The show is currently being installed at London's Fashion & Textiles Museum, where it opens a week on Friday (May 20).

Curated by Timothy Everest - who was a Nutter trainee (others include John Galliano) - and the FTM's Dennis Nothdruft, the show centres on exhibits contributed by such Nutter clients as Mick Jagger, Elton John, Cilla Black and Justin de Villeneuve.






Girls From Woodstock 1969

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Girls From Woodstock 1969

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